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ARTF RC Aircrafts

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Introduction

I built this “Arising Star” ARTF RC aircraft to give my young nephew some ideas what it is like to build and fly a RC aircraft. If you are new to ARTF RC aircrafts, I hope the series of photographs presented below will be helpful to you when working on your own ARTF aircraft project.

It is important to mention that I followed the instructions that came with the “Arising Star” kit I did not find any difficulty to assemble the ARTF aircraft. Meanwhile, I will be flying this almost completed RC aircraft shortly and will return to update this webpage soon.

Assembling of ARTF RC Aircraft

ARTF RC Aircraft - Rising Star Specification Graphic

Standard specification for the “Arising Star” ARTF RC aircraft - a four-function RC trainer for A6 engine (i.e. engine rudder elevator & ailerons). The wing is held on with rubber bands. I prefer this to fixing the wing to the fuselage for an ARTF trainer like the “Arising Star” RC aircraft.

ARTF RC Aircraft Photo

Photo-1:
The box ready to open: all the pre-assembled parts and component of the ARTF “Arising Star” trainer aircraft were contained in a doubled boxed package when arriving from “STEVE WEBB Models” hobby shop by special delivery.

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Photo-2:
The “Arising Star” package contains almost everything that you require to build the ARTF RC aircraft flying, except for engine, radio-control gear and glue to complete the whole aircraft. It should be mentioned that there are some kits coming with items you don’t really like, but for this ARTF aircraft kit everything seems to be fine for me.

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Photo-3:
Mock up of the RC aircraft to see how thing fits and nothing requires adjusting. Some kits have parts and components which require some ‘surgery’ to get them to fit into position, but for this case everything of the “Arising Star” aircraft kit fits perfectly.

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Photo-4:
To make the “Arising Star” ARTF RC Trainer flyable, I bought a brand new " 46 engine" and silencer glow plug (i.e. as shown in the box) to complete the entire assembling project.

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Photo-5:
My ‘J.R’ radio-control gear, four servos, receiver and battery pack. Also a on board battery checker.

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Photo-6:
The tail plane of the ARTF RC trainer was glued in position with ‘white wood’ glue. The rudder was not glued at that time as I had used it to check the alignment. Meanwhile, the covering was removed in the area that requiring glue.

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Photo-7:
The rudder was glued in position with ‘white wood’ glue. It should be noted that the covering had to be trimmed off neatly for better workmanship. Also, the covering was removed in the area that requiring glue.

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Photo-8:
The ARTF RC aircraft wing came in 2 sections with a brace to give it the correct angle. This brace has to be glued into one and the wing-half and position and left to set. Then the other wing-half was glued accordingly. I used 24-hour epoxy glue, mask tape and clamped for my project. The wing sections were clamed and hold into position until the epoxy glue set & dried completely. It should be noted that the covering was removed in the area that requiring glue.

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Photo-9:
Working on the trailing edge wing reinforcement pieces: the covering removed in the area that requiring glue. Same as in previous tasks I used ‘white wood’ glue for the task.

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Photo-10:
The wing dowels of the ‘Arising Star” ARTF RC trainer were glued in with ‘white wood’ glue. These dowels are to take the rubber bands which hold the wing in place. By using this method the wing should come off undamaged when it involve in a heavy landing.

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Photo-11:
Plastic control horns of the ARTF RC trainer were fitted to elevators and rudders, and connected to fuselage push rods.

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Photo-12:
Servo mount was glued to the underside of wing servo fitted, and the push rods were installed accordingly. At that time the push rods had not been trimmed to the required length.

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Photo-13:
The ARTF RC aircraft servos were installed in the fuselage. The push rod wires had not been trimmed at the time. Note I placed the on-off switch outside the fuselage.

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Photo-14:
The plastic made RC aircraft fuel tank was installed in the ARTF RC aircraft compartment and it was fitted perfectly into position like a glove.

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Photo-15:
The ARTF RC aircraft engine was screwed to its mount. Note the fuel tubes were placed at the rear. Both the spinner and the prop were fitted to check for clearance.

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